The festive season is officially here, the time that many families spend together, enjoy a traditional Christmas dinner and celebrate the time of year in their own special way.  Around the UK many home owners have been busy putting up decorations including outside Christmas lights, Lumens Effect, over the last few weeks but what effect does it have on us and the environment?

the festive period will consume 207 kWh, the equivalent of 22.8 days of the average British household’s electricity consumption

 

With 1 in 3 Brits (32%) still not using energy efficient lights whilst a sizable 41% also confessing to leaving their lights on for more than six hours a day over the festive season (1),  households that still use incandescent Christmas lights are set to have a spike in their electricity bill this December.

Recently the price of buying LED lights has become far cheaper than when they first arrived in the market for consumers so why wouldn’t every household be buying them to display proudly in their own winter wonderland?

 

To put this in perspective a recent survey found that 52% of respondents intended to display decorative Christmas lighting outside the house. With this in mind GoCompare calculated that a display of 100 five-watt bulbs switched on for six hours a day over the festive period will consume 207 kWh, the equivalent of 22.8 days of the average British household’s electricity consumption (2).

 

Which means that the older lights use a considerable amount of energy per six hour period, and in turn has a detrimental effect on the environment. Statistics have shown that on a average of a household displaying 4000 bulbs over the festive season, incandescent bulbs emit 4.2 metric tons of Carbon Emissions whilst LEDS emits a mere 0.813 tons (3).

With the argument clearly in favour of LED Christmas lighting due to low energy costs, up to 20 times lower than the incandescent alternative due to their lower wattage we are taking a step in the right direction to cut carbon emissions so that we can enjoy seeing streets lit up by festive lights for years to come, but we still have a long way to go to meet several of our energy targets.
Danny Pay

Author Danny Pay

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